Top of this page
Skip navigation, go straight to the content

Patients UCB Stories Detail

Osteoporosis Insights: Fractures have slammed me into a medical wall at 59

  • Posted by

    Walking up a flight of stairs, carrying a shopping bag or going for a walk – these may seem like every day events done without a second thought, but for people with osteoporosis in fear of the next fracture, they come loaded with worry.

    Osteoporosis is a condition that weakens bones over time, making them thinner and more likely to break.  For people with the condition, a small bump or fall can lead to a broken bone,  and for many, this creates not only a physical impact, but makes waves emotionally too.

    To further understand, we spoke to our Experts by Experience panel; a group of patients having sustained fractures due to osteoporosis about what it’s like living in fear of breaking another bone.

    “Every day [I live in fear]. I make sure I wear the right shoes, I watch the curbs, I take elevators when available, I have throw rugs secured, and my house is well lit. I do have a flashlight near the bed. I don't want to fall, so I try to be careful.”

    Another member described feeling “slammed into a medical wall” at the age of just 59: “Three fractures in two years is concerning. Something I had never thought would happen with me. I was in good health, great physical shape, had spent my life exercising and eating well. I will forever continue to hold on to the very small glimmer of hope I so tightly grasp in my hand.”

    If you or a relative have suffered a fracture over the age of 50 and are in fear of fracturing another bone, speak to your doctor or local patient support group for help and advice on living with and managing the condition.

    Tags:
    Categories:
    Share:

Leave a Comment

 
Comment:

Posted by Christine Sharp, 06 August 2018 These vertebral fractures are devastatingly life changing. My first one was at age 55. I have since sustained multiple fractures resulting in 6 inches of height loss. This causes severe digestive problems and breathing difficulties due to internal organs being squashed into 6 inches less space.
The psychological effects are enormous as you don’t like the change in body shape. Feel totally out of control of this dreadfully painful disease. The fear of further fractures and the horrific pain never leaves your consciousness.
We desperately need more research and more effective drugs to stop this terrible progression of fractures.